I’ve been thinking about this for a while now. I’m worried this will be a step backwards for equality and understanding – a short term gain that will only fuel the misunderstandings and lack of empathy.

There have been excellent articles written (see links below) which outline some of the key reasons. The need for role models and mentors is something I constantly struggle with, although I have had excellent role models from both genders during my career. I understand how tough it can be for women who never get that ‘tap on the shoulder’ – for women who are ignored. A need for a meeting of sympathetic mothers who are struggling with the same issues; like-minded discussions around childcare and empathy at work. Or, how a female only NPQH will develop confidence, will cover the same content but will offer more female role models.

I worry we are shooting ourselves in the foot. After all female leaders will be managing men, and prospective male leaders will be managing women. Issues such as childcare and managing time need to be discussed with both genders, preferably at the same time, so reactions and experiences can be shared. Conscious and unconscious bias need to be a part of leadership discussions for both genders – again in a surrounding where dialogue can be shared, can be monitored, ensured that both genders are heard. Prospective leaders need to know the impact of decisions and need to understand these issues – these are issues that need to be in the NPQH full stop, and it is here that efforts should be maintained. We risk the view that these issues become female issues – or that women won’t discuss them with male leaders and male staff. Leadership training, much like good PSHE provision in school, should offer space for these areas. Not close them off. If this pattern is followed would the result be single-gender cohorts for all?

Of course I’m not saying that mixed gender NPQH misses out these things – it may do, of course, which is an issue in itself. More than that however there may become a perception that a female only NPQH will do ‘more’ of these issues. We will create a female-only space that is discussing things that directly affect the men we lead and the boys we teach. Women will then be forced to choose – a course which seemingly supports and challenges these, or one which doesn’t?  The offering of female role models is also problematic to me – as experiences differ vastly from one person to the next – looking for a role model which reflects to closely your own experience is, I feel, a mistake. Inspiration is needed from everywhere and we all need to recognise the challenges; not just gender, but class, geography, family etc etc that we all experience. If you narrow your world view, you narrow how far you can go in it. My most empathetic and challenging mentor was male and I credit that ‘tap in the shoulder’ that nudged me forwards to a brilliant female Head Teacher. Likewise I have seen leaders of both genders belittle and devalue their staff.

Headteachers need the confidence to speak up, in front of anyone regardless of gender, this is true. It is also true that situations occur where women feel their opinion is not valued, where we have to support one another, echo others’ thoughts and generally ‘keep an eye out’ for one another. Whilst the WomenEd 10% braver mantra goes some way to developing this, developing leaders need to meet others who handle difficult conversations differently, regardless of gender. Learn from the experience of others. Leaders will always have to tackle difficulties and leadership training should help with this. For all candidates. It may be the case that male candidates need support with this or need support to recognise any unconscious bias they may themselves be displaying. It may that we need generic bias training for all leaders – including volunteers such as governors – but I don’t think a female only NPQH will help with these broader issues. It may indeed hinder the experience of those who only draw on female voices, missing the issues that men experience as they go through the process.

I am open to convincing though – and would love to hear others’ thoughts. I don’t think we can say that men can’t have an opinion, though I haven’t seen many. We need to build a professional qualification that is fit for the future rather than echoing current mistakes. Calling out those leadership course that don’t offer a range of empathetic voices.

Links:

TES Article

Hopeful Headteacher Blog

Julie Hunter – Why a Women Only NPQH

 

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