Don’t believe everything…

  • 3rd post in the #WeeklyBlogChallenge17

When worlds collide…

Two things happened this week which suprised me. Number one was the earnest decleration from a pupil that President-Elect Donald Trump used to be an American Wrestler and therefore will be an excellent President (feel free to google) and then a come back from another pupil earnestly declaring that he can’t be a good President because he was so rude to the journalist (at the press conference this week).

Now, both these pupils are upper KS2 and both are pretty tech savvy. The interesting thing here, for me, is how our children are taking in their news and how they choose to filter it. I don’t want to turn this into a lecture about how we need to teach children to filter news, and recognise bias (I have written about this before) – but news, bias and indeed fake news is growing faster than ever before. I don’t remember the children ever being this interested in current affairs – it is indeed true that the world is becoming smaller. And because our children are starting from the familiar to them, they are connecting world events directly to themselves.  There natural channel is You Tube – they start from an online presence and then go from there. Trump being a WWE wrestler was a story in that child’s world – and then immediately put a new spin on what was formerly an ‘adult thing’ – From there who knows where they to to… (let’s not consider the language they may have seen…)

I’ve also had children tell me that Obama isn’t American, that everyone hated Thatcher, and well, don’t get me started on the issues that came up with the European Referendum. What is our role when children ask us about these things they have read? Often they have no shades of grey in these issues and us, in an effort to simplify, we often mislead. Looking at theses issues in detail can take too much time in school. It needs to be considered with parents, with Digital Literacy lessons and alongside other curriculum content so as to put it into context (propaganda then and now… for example).

 

A challenge, and one not unique to the age, but arguably much harder now than ever.

 

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