11 Nov

Climate Day of Action Speech

Climate Rally Talk

Good Afternoon, 


Thank you so much for having me here today. I feel really proud, on this national day of Climate Action, to be here in front of this amazing rally. As a headteacher, I already have privilege  – and I  see first hand just how motivated, concerned and eager our young people are to make a difference. To make things better. Seeing you all here as well, is just brilliant. Exactly what we need to see. 

I want to talk to you today about teachers, and about schools, teachers play a pivotal role in our children’s outlook and future careers. I was able to complete the Climate Change Course from the united nations  around three years ago – and it really opened my eyes. Learning about the impact – not some possible future, but what is happening now, from temperature changes to water levels and soil quality – was worrying. Exploring the way in which current issues are affecting some of the poorest nations in the world was heart breaking, but – and very importantly- learning how we can help was just what I needed to hear. It is more than tree planting and recycling.  

The current education secretary does, apparently, want to put climate change at the heart of education. And this is gratifying to hear – schools, already do so much. We already encourage our pupils to think about their actions, and the actions of their family or community. We already give ownership, stewardship, of their environment and their planet. Deforestation, trading and human geography is already on the curriculum this is true.  But this is not enough, and is not,  what the education secretary indeed to focus on. Our teachers need to know the issues  and the impact, our schools needs to be clear on the science – and we need to give our young people a grounding in all of this so that they can grow up knowing it is not futile. Our children should grow up with skills and the knowledge to make a difference, with the resilience and creativity to take advantage of new career paths. The new policies announced this week in draft from deal with career education, with net zero demands for large contractors, with food waste and with resources for the teaching of, and adoption of, sustainable literacy. 

But we need to ensure this given the resources that it will need. It cannot be another stick to beat schools with, another checklist, another ofsted accountability target. Our leaders, our government need to set an example, we need to make it a priority for teacher training now. We need to make sure parents are on side, that our communities understand the need for schools to take a science based, practical and career led lead. Our young people deserve world class resources and facilities, qualifications that support their goals, and an education that will allow them to understand the world around them. 

This is why I am so glad for events like this today. It gives me hope – and it should give you all hope too. Schools are such an amazing resource – let’s make sure they are given the support and resources they need to do it. 

18 Sep

I’m leaving teaching – but I’ll be back.

A very difficult decision to leave this Christmas was taken over the summer – though it had been building up over the last few months. The proverbial straw for me was an article about EYFS reforms I was reading when I suddenly realised that I had reached saturation point. I was becoming someone who read education updates and news and sighed heavily. The type of school leader whose eyes rolled when ofsted tweaked guidance, or when subject reviews were announced. I was no longer excited by it all – and as the summer went on I realised that I was not looking forward to September – wasn’t getting excited about the return like I usually do. And any kind of school coverage in the news just caused outright dread.

Covid of course – but more than that – the realisation that, as we came to the end of it we would learn nothing. More than ever now schools were at the heart of their community. Schools, my school, had worked so hard to keep their community safe and to provide some normality for their pupils. (And don’t get me started on the Herculean efforts of staff to move provision online). Instead of a recognition that perhaps our professionalism was to be commended (or at least not doubted!) we had contempt from politicians and policy makers.

I am so disappointed that the chance we have had for a rethink, for recognition and for renewal has been lost. In fact, it seems to be more materialistic and about ‘end product’ than ever. The changes for baseline, the ‘advice’ from subject reviews, the Ofsted inspection guidance, the continual demand for ‘catch up’. It’s too much. It’s unsustainable and it’s not what I came into this job for.

I’m lucky, or at least I think I am. I am thinking in a new direction and am excited to be heading towards an MSc – exploring Climate Change policy and Zero Carbon Initiatives. But I know so many teachers who are really struggling with this. So many schools will be left rudderless – and governing bodies are going to need support. I don’t feel proud about my decision, it is sad. I will miss teaching immensely. It has been a privilege to work with hugely inspirational people over the years – I have met amazing and resilient children and have been honoured to be at the start of many teachers’ careers. I know I will never really leave…I know I will want to get back to it! It just doesn’t feel like it is the job I love right now.

Postscript – as I was editing this social media is awash with rumours that Gavin Williamson should get a knighthood. So. There’s that.

04 Sep

Wake Me Up When September Ends

woman holding sign

A bit of an apology to Green Day here!

I, like many of my colleagues are ready for whatever this school term may bring. But I wanted to take the chance to reflect. I fear many school leaders are bracing for a storm. And in the spirit of airing anxieties I thought I’d explore just what the advice means for primary schools now.

Government Advice

‘Overwhelming’ – an ‘Avalanche’ – according to research carried out by the University of Cambridge and University College London these are the words that heads have used to describe the amout of information received since the beginning of the pandemic. Heads mentioned that they didn’t know what to expect from one day to the next – and that this was more stressful even than student welfare. This was my experience – this summer has been a breathe of fresh air because of the absence of government updates. So – all good right?

Well.. now we seem to have gone from one extreme to another.

The latest government advice seems to be fixated on ‘normal’ school life resuming as much as possible. Suggesting that assemblies resume and that masks are no longer necesssary. Ventilation is ‘important’ but we have received no support in enuring this over the winter months.

They emphasise that schools will no longer be responsible for track and trace and that bubbles are not expected. UNLESS. And here is a big unless – unless there is an ‘outbreak’ – defined as five closely related cases (or 10% of the school population, whichever comes first). Then there will need to be an extra plan in place that relies on the school knowing the close contacts of these cases and putting mitigation in place.

This concerns me (and others) because it appears that the government is waiting to be reactive instead of proactive – to me we are waiting for the inevitable rise in cases and then we have a selection of measures that we can out in place. These measures will necessarily differ from school to school and cause confusion for parents.

Headteachers told me that they find the measures lacking, that they are using local advice instead, that they are worried about their community and about the possiblity of infections spreading from their school. The ‘outbreak’ advice seems to be causing concerns as the management plan offers a ‘suite’ of ideas which Headteachers and school leaders have to choose from. Most schools that I know are using a kind of ‘hybrid’ approach and keeping some measures in place anyway.

Headteachers are not (even now!) infection experts – luckily I have amazing local Public Health support – but this may not be the case everywhere. In a small school like mine, just how many of us would be classed as close contacts? Should I be thinking of minimising this now before an outbreak? Should staff be encouraged to stay within ‘adult’ bubbles? Remember they still do not want us to close schools – but how realistic is this?

Ripples

This lack of mitigating advice will have repercussions elsewhere – as a small school two or three staff members either ill or isolating will create huge problems in providing quality education. Parents (and indeed staff) who are anxious, or who have responsiblity for vulnerable members of the family may worry about children returning to ‘normality’.

It will also mean that in the event of another serious wave, or a different version, then the government may have to rush out advice and measures, reverting back to last year, which will lead us right back to the initial ‘avalanche’ of advice.

Sources:

https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/heads-reveal-how-overwhelming-government-guidance-held-schools-back-as-covid-hit

23 Aug

Climate Change – Why it’s not hopeless and we cannot let our children think it is.

people holding banner

Conquering Climate Doomism in the classroom is vital if our children are going to grow up hopeful

The sheer scale of the challenges facing us at the minute can seem overwhelming, but Climate Doomism – thinking there is no point, nothing can be done now – is just as dangerous.

person holding a green plant
Photo by Akil Mazumder on Pexels.com

The data right now does not look good – but there are reasons to be be hopeful.

Young activists are really making a difference. From an international level with activitists such as Greta Thunberg to local influence – here in Cumbria with the excellent ‘Another Way’ set up by the inspirational Amy Bray.

The voting public are becoming more aware with climate conscious leaders such as Biden, and the recent addition of Green Party members to the Scottish Cabinet.

Emphasising the positive and looking at what impact the next generation can have will be a vital job for teachers.

Have the Facts Ready – Age appropriate, obviously – but you need to know what the science is. Knowledge can be reassuring  –  and it can help to put concerns into perspective.  Talking about what is on the news is a good first step and will allow you to see what the children already know.

Share Good News – There is so much good stuff happening out there right now – sharing success stories is important.  Negative and ‘shock factor’ news stories often get so much more publicity – which is a good discussion point with pupils.

You can find stories on sites such as https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/

Encourage Action and Agency – Individual actions are important and are not futile. There are plenty of opportunities already within the school curriculum to discuss these.  Likewise, as they get older they need to see how their individual actions can affect the larger system. PSHE lessons and British Values give our children the chance to learn about rights, responsibilities and democracy. Use this to demonstrate the options they have for lobbying, or for talking to those in power. Invite local politicians in, business leaders, shop owners; keep the conversation going.

Finally, find likeminded individuals – Groups to explore the issues and what can be done. Locally, or in school, there may be youth groups already – but starting one could also provide opportunities to be useful and to share worries and concerns. 

Resources here:

Michael Mann – The New Climate War – The Fight to Take Back our Planet

Books that may be useful: https://www.nrdc.org/stories/your-guide-talking-kids-all-ages-about-climate-change

Extinction Rebellion Youth: https://m.facebook.com/XRYouth/

21 Mar

One Year on… A Reflection

As I started writing this I realised that, in fact, it would be impossible to write an adequate blog post on the whole year. This then is more of a summary, a review – a kind of diary into what did happen. There is more to be written here – and more time to give this. But – we need to start somewhere, and so to paraphrase Lewis Carroll, lets start at the beginning.

This, I hope, will be a more optimistic piece – after all – we have soft sunlight here in Cumbria right now, vaccinations are going well (so far) – and I haven’t watched any government briefings for ooh, at least a week.

What has this last year given us then?

The beginning – preparedness – how were we prepared for what is probably the first national crisis that any of us have led schools through? When it became clear that the virus was spreading – as Italy suffered and went into lockdown suddenly we were all paying attention – well the public health messages were all about hygiene and that phrase ‘social distancing’. And, well we were, quite honestly found lacking. It turns out that many of our policies and risk assessments were not really written for a pandemic of this nature. (Why they were written is another question.) Government-level communication was too big of a juggernaut to respond to our questions and concerns mid-March, and schools found out about closures along with everyone else. From then on we were running to catch up. And of course suddenly everyone was talking about social distancing.

Once it became clear thought that schools were closing for a while – and that lockdown was the way we were heading well then schools could start to support their communities better. By April we were settled into Co-operation – school leaders showing a previously unknown level of comradeship and peer-support throughout this crisis. For me, here in Northern Cumbria, it can often feel isolating, but the machine that is School Support kicked in and school leaders worked together magnificently. We planned hubs, we identified vulnerable children (and staff) – we volunteered, we cheered one another up and we listened to what others were going through. But mostly we marvelled at how much life had changed in such a short time. The support from our Local Authority was astounding – and as an Academy Head Teacher the irony of this is not lost on me. By the end of April it seemed very clear that everyone was experiencing this very differently – and each school needed different things.

Of course in the background of April, May and June teachers across the country were transferring their skills to online teaching – a process many of us are just starting to feel comfortable with. Often with some pupils in school as well, meaning staff were juggling parallel plans – and we became more familiar with this as time went on. Parents were adjusting to juggling their own family life and everybody was suddenly more acquainted with the twists and turns of school curriculum than they had ever wanted to be. Meanwhile schools were embroiled in an ‘access’ panic – whereby the government and school leaders were at odds over the provision of tech – it turns out that large swathes of the country did not have good internet access (who knew?) and the online provision of easily accessibly lessons and content was sapping teachers morale and time.

In support the Government funded the set up of Oak Academy – which, regardless of the political or pedagogical wrangling managed to galvanise the profession and provide some much needed sequential learning that was accessible. They are still wrangling with the organisation of physical devices but some progress has been made: we have had sim cards, some data free academic websites and my school did get two chromebooks. Of course by this time there were other cracks showing in the school leadership systems – most notably the constant and often downwright confusing communications from Government. And, whilst changes to testing regimes, risk assessment, guidance for online provision, Ofsted (don’t ask) were all passed on to schools almost daily, and usually at unsociable hours, schools supported their communities as much as they could. It should be mentioned here that system-level communication has improved, but press briefings prior to any official announcements just seem the ultimate act of disrespect. Unions and government began to look at just how safe schools could be, a topic that is still the point of much debate now.

The summer is an interesting time to look back on. Like many schools we welcomed limited year groups back in July, but the stress and anxiety for school staff was palapable, and whilst we concentrated on providing for all of our pupils many of us were beginning to see the personal toll the pandemic would take first-hand.

This huge part of school life is one that I think we are still not learning from – following on from a full opening in September schools are still not supported for covid-related staff absences and are not offered support to provide more staff (which would help provide smaller classs sizes, provision of PPA and sharing of the workload) – this in turn leads overwork and burn out for school staff which will ultimately hurt pupils.

Other changes for school staff involved openness – schools were sharing much more with each other, both internally and with parents. Communication had to be very open as we had to find ways to talk to those who may be ‘hard to reach’ – social media came into its own and WhatsApp groups replaced the morning coffee.

Our school, like many others, began to look outside more. Being in such stunning and inspirational surroundings this is something we can do more of – and outdoor education (not just education in the outdoors) needs to flourish in the future.

All of this – these societal changes – the working from home, the online element of schooling and the emotional toll of ‘keeping up appearances’ means that many of us may not have been at our best this past year. We may not have made all of the best choices – or given ourselves enough time to learn from these choices. And we are not looking back objectively or clear-eyed just yet, we are not yet in a position to collecitvely breath out and survey the landscape. The changes and the education priority shifting we can do post-pandemic is something else to reflect on.

15 Feb

What I’ve Learned Remote Teaching

person holding yellow and pink lego blocks

Teaching online, it turns out, is not that different from in the classroom… Somethings definitely take longer – especially at first – but then there are some things that are easier. Here are a few tips I’ve picked up along the way.

Time

Timing, and that dreaded word, pace – is harder to judge when working online. Especially if you factor in any connection issues. The first time I set my class a First News based task (which would have been a lesson normally) and it took them almost all morning I realised I needed to rethink how I broke down the tasks and how I made sure they had the time. I’ve found that ideally you give them longer to think, slightly smaller tasks with less time to complete and specific time for questions using visuals – e.g. a physical clock you have with you or one shared on your screen.

Note taking

I’ve been modelling how I take notes on jamboard – especially when working with history and science topics. Sharing the screen to watch or listen to a presentation and taking notes together not only models this important skill but also gives them something to refer to later. Of course, depending on your platform – they could all contribute – but some children may find this a challenge. Equally those children who have got this skill could then lead the note taking.

Questions

Questioning is still so important – and it is easier to give all the children the chance to answer online. Depending on the platform you are using the children can reply to just you, or you give them some thinking time and then ask them all to type in at the same time. You can also ask specific children first, which then allows you to check understanding. We use Google Apps and so you can open a jamboard as well as using the chat.

You can always get them to write on paper and hold answers up as well!

Resources

This is tricky – especially at first when you don’t know what the children have at home (or they don’t know themselves) – but there are lots of ways to share video, to make use of the share screen and to give presentations. And there is some really high quality stuff out there now – we use White Rose Maths and often share screen their videos. This allows you to pause and ask the relevant questions, as well as to extend areas that you know your class need to work on. Many of the ‘home learning’ video based resurces do not require logins either – which means you can leave the links up for those children not online.

Encouraging Independence

An excellent side effect of remote learning is that the children have to learn the be slightly more independent… Of course the first step to this is encouragement – raising their confidence – sharing good examples, asking the children to explain their learning and allowing them to read out what they are proud of are all good ways of doing this. However the technology itself can also be a barrier – and so model the different ways you can present your screen, watch video, share work etc etc. Ask the children to explain to one another – teaching one another so that if they cannot get hold of the teacher, but they are finding something tricky, then they can help one another.

Other tips I have picked up along the way include planning for online and offline work – so that the children can pick up what they are doing without needing to be online all of the time.

It would be great to share any more tips that you have!